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By R. Karl

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Fish Cleaning
Filleting Bass
Filleting Bluegills
Filleting Northern
Filleting Walleye
Skinning Pike

Filleting Freshwater Fish

Filleting Freshwater Game Fish

 

 

 

Whether you favor the soft-water fishing season, the hard-water season, or both, Filleting Freshwater Game Fish: Northern, Walleye, Bass and Bluegill is the perfect “how to” for every angler who desires to prepare their catch – for an immediate trip to the sauté pan or for a stay in your freezer.

Having fished and cleaned his catch from the waters of the upper-Midwest for over forty years, R. Karl shares his knowledge, providing everything you need to know: proper equipment, step-by-step instructions – including exactly how to remove those pesky “y-bones” from northern pike – and includes a special chapter on how to remove the skin and wrap/prepare your catch prior to freezing.

Complete with easy-to-follow instructions and Illustrated with actual full-color photographs of the process, this book is a must-have addition to any serious angler’s collection.  View R. Karl's recommended equipment for fish filleting.

Excerpt from the Filleting Walleye chapter:

"I saw my first walleye cleaned and filleted by a family friend who was also on the trip. Ray was a great outdoorsman with a belly laugh that could make anyone appreciate his smile. And after a stringer of ‘eyes was brought in, he was as fast as lightning with a fillet knife. In fact, he was faster than anyone I have ever seen, before or since – I later nicknamed him “30-Second Ray” – and the finished fillet was as if prepared by a surgeon.

I thought: “this is easy” and asked if I could give it a try. I failed miserably on my first attempt (a 1 ½ lb. walleye was reduced to a patch of flesh about 10cm long and Ray exploded with laughter), but I swore to emulate the work of Ray. After 30 years of filleting walleyes using the same method I learned from my mentor, I actually got pretty good – albeit never as fast. One summer, a resort owner in northern Minnesota showed me a different way. I was amazed at how easy it was. The finished product yielded as much if not more fillet, and the method was even easier. Ray is now long gone, but wherever he is; I know he would be proud of me. Walleyes are some of the most sought-after fish in any lake. If you have not yet seen or tired this method, I hope that the instructions and photos that follow will help you to learn it.

Start as you might normally start: fish belly towards you and fish head on your left. (This method is for a right-handed person; rotate the fish 180° to the right if you are left-handed.) Make the first cut down and into the fish just behind the pectoral fin.
 

Comments from readers who have used these instructions:

"I just wanted to say thanks a lot for the fillet pics.  They helped me FINALLY do a decent job of filleting a walleye." (D.F.)

"I have just read and used your technique for filleting a couple of walleyes I caught last night.  I chose your technique over some others I found due to the way you removed the rib bones.  I found it to be very easy to follow..." (A.M.)


Recipe Idea:
The walleye cheeks can be used to make several fish dishes as well as one of my favorite hors d’oevres: Walleye Cheek Dip.

 

 

 

 

 

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